Frank Infurna

Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
1104

Biography

Frank J. Infurna is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University. He received his doctorate in human development and family studies from Pennsylvania State University and his bachelor's in psychology and brain and cognitive science from the University of Rochester. He is a developmental psychologist with a general interest in studying psychosocial and health development in adulthood and old age from a lifespan perspective. More specifically, his research examines how older adults adapt resiliently to the developmental challenges and other life stressors that they face. He is also interested in identifying psychosocial factors that promote healthy aging outcomes and has extensive experience in the use of contemporary methods of longitudinal analysis, including latent growth curve (multilevel) modeling, growth mixture modeling, and survival models.

Education

  • Post-Doctoral Researcher, Institute of Psychology, Humboldt University, Berlin 2013
  • Visiting Research Fellow, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), 2011-2013
  • Ph.D. Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University 2012
  • B.A. Psychology and Brain and Cognitive Science, University of Rochester 2007

Research Interests

I am a developmental psychologist with a general interest in studying psychosocial and health development in adulthood and old age from a lifespan perspective. Drawing from seminal notions of lifespan development and emerging methodologies for longitudinal analysis, my research agenda is centered on two intertwined research objectives.

1. Psychosocial factors that promote healthy aging

My research examines the extent to which perceived control, defined as one's beliefs regarding their ability to attain desired outcomes, is associated with healthy aging. Outcomes of healthy aging that I focus on include cognition, disability, disease, and mortality. More recently, my colleagues and I have examined pathways that link perceived control to healthy aging, such as physical activity, biological health, and physical fitness. An additional focus has been on linking whether rates of change in perceived control, over and above, absolute levels are predictive of healthy aging outcomes. We have shown that more positive rates of change in perceived control over time are protective against mortality. By effectively showing that changes over time have meaningful implications for health, this research has the potential to open up avenues for intervention and identifying mechanisms linking psychosocial factors to health outcomes. 

2. Resilience to major life stressors

My second research focus revolves around the extent to which individuals are able to adapt and overcome major life stressors. Major life stressors are disruptive events that result in a qualitative shift in ones life circumstances. Examples include acute onset stressors, such as a cancer diagnosis or spousal loss, as well as chronic stressors that include childhood abuse or poverty. These stressors can have severe short- and long-term implications for functioning across domains, such as well-being, health or social relationships. My research program focuses on examining the nature of and processes implicated in individuals ability to be resilient to acute and chronic major life stressors in adulthood and old age. To address this research objective, my colleagues and I use longitudinal panel surveys (i.e., Health and Retirement Study, German Socio-Economic Panel Study, and HILDA) to track how pertinent outcomes, such as well-being and health change in relation to adversities, such as bereavement and disability. We also examine how specific factors, such as socio-demographics and health, social, and personal resources contribute to better overall outcomes prior to, during, and following these adversities.

 

Research Activity

Courses

Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 447Psychology of Aging
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 598Special Topics
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 447Psychology of Aging
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 498Pro-Seminar
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
CMN 592Research
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
CMN 592Research
PSY 598Special Topics
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 447Psychology of Aging
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 498Pro-Seminar
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Summer 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 447Psychology of Aging
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 447Psychology of Aging
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 591Seminar