Psychology PhD (quantitative)

The quantitative psychology PhD concentration focuses on the broad class of quantitative and methodological issues that arise in the conduct of both basic and applied psychological research. Not only does the, "why?" intrigue students of the quantitative Phd program, but the "how?"

The quantitative concentration is committed to training the next generation of psychological methodologists, who will make contributions in developing methods in the areas of measurement, design, analysis, and to evaluate the utility of new and existing methods for use in psychological research. The ASU quantitative psychology Phd is a highly-ranked program led by innovative and world-renown faculty.

The quantitative concentration focuses on the broad class of quantitative and methodological issues that arise in the conduct of both basic and applied psychological research. Core faculty members in quantitative are typically affiliated with other doctoral program areas which further supports the training of students of quantitative methods against a backdrop of methodological issues associated with the development of the substance of psychological science.

Graduates are prepared for faculty positions as quantitative psychologists in departments of psychology, for methodologist positions in large research centers and for positions in industry. Graduates of the program hold faculty positions at major research universities and research centers. 

IMPORTANT: To be considered for this PhD program, you must complete the application through ASU's online portal AND submit your material through Slideroom.

5 years to degree
6 research labs
9 faculty members

Degree Overview

The 84-hour program of study includes a written comprehensive exam, an oral comprehensive, a prospectus and a dissertation. Prospective doctoral candidates should have a passion and interest in cognitive science, have demonstrated research skills in a senior thesis, have a minimum of a 3.00 cumulative GPA and score in the upper quintile of GRE scores. 

Areas of Interest

Faculty and doctoral students undertake methodological research of direct relevance to substantive psychology.

New methodologies are developed and applied in three broad areas:

  1. modern approaches to measurement of psychological constructs;
  2. research; design; and innovations;
  3. data analysis and techniques, including both those with established utility for psychological data and those enjoying only recent or rarer use in psychology.

Quantitative faculty currently have ongoing research programs in the development of statistical methodologies for mediation analyses, multilevel modeling, the evaluation of the performance of structural equation models, latent class analyses, research design strategies under conditions of self-selection and attrition, cross-group measurement equivalence, measurement bias in psychological tests, missing data analyses, multitrait-multimethod analyses, testing and interpreting statistical interactions and the longitudinal growth modeling of psychological constructs.

How to apply

The Department of Psychology application process is completed online through ASU Graduate Education. Prospective students must submit the admission application form along with the fee and official transcripts. For the department’s doctoral programs, students must submit supplemental application materials through SlideRoom, which requires an additional fee. 

2019-20 Admission Recruitment by Quantitative Psychology Faculty

"I chose the ASU quant program because of the people. The students were open, many were collaborating on projects together, and they had a helpful attitude – both in school, such as brainstorming in research projects and sharing programs, and outside of school, such as helping me while I was getting settled when I moved here and being there for support throughout the program.

The group of professors is absolutely great, not just because of their cutting-edge research, but also their genuine investment in mentoring students. Their wide variety of backgrounds, their knowledge, and their open attitude towards working with all students – regardless of who the advisor is – has given me a very complete training."


- Gabriela Stegmann, PhD

Curriculum

Students receive a mix of training in quantitative methods and in substantive psychology, with the extent of substantive training, above and beyond quantitative training, dependent on the interest of the individual student. Within the Department of Psychology we offer the full complement of course work in analysis of variance and regression, multivariate analysis, structural equation modeling, modern measurement, experimental and quasi-experimental design, with additional more specialized training in topics of interest including regression graphics, methods in prevention research, mediation analyses, missing data analyses, multilevel modeling, latent class analyses and longitudinal growth modeling. Additional quantitative course work is available in other departments on campus, and cooperative arrangements with these departments are well established. The quantitative curriculum and program requirements are given below.

A minimum of 84 hours is required. 

Requirements and electives

Hours

Core courses

21

Electives

9

Substantive coursework

12

Milestone courses

24

Dissertation

12

Total hours required

84

 

 

Courses and electives

Required Courses (7 courses, 21 credits):

 Psychological Methodology Electives (3 courses, 9 credits)

In addition to the courses listed above, elective quantitative courses may be taken outside the Department of Psychology across the university. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, categorical data analysis, econometrics, time series analysis, exploratory data analysis, epidemiology, survey sampling, and mixed models.

Substantive Coursework (2 courses, 6 credits). Students are expected to take two courses in a substantive area of psychology, of which one may be a research methods course in a substantive area.

Additional substantive or methodological electives (2 courses, 6 credits) include readings and conferences; and special research topics.

Milestone Courses include PSY 592: Master’s Research (6 credits); PSY 599: Master’s thesis (6 credits); PSY 792: Post-Master’s Research (12 credits); and PSY 799: Dissertation (12 credits) 

Required Courses (7 courses, 21 credits):

  • PSY 530 Analysis of Variance
  • PSY 531 Multiple Regression Analysis
  • PSY 532 Analysis of Multivariate Data
  • PSY 533 Structural Equation Modeling
  • PSY 534 Psychometric Methods
  • PSY 555 Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs
  • PSY 591 Quantitative Seminar

Psychological Methodology Electives (3 courses, 9 credits):

  • PSY 536 Methods in Prevention Research
  • PSY 537 Longitudinal Growth Modeling
  • PSY 538 Advanced SEM
  • PSY 539 Multilevel Modeling
  • PSY 540 Missing Data Analysis
  • PSY 543 Mediation Analysis
  • PSY 544 Item Response Theory
  • PSY 591 Advanced Regression and Graphics
  • PSY 591 Data Mining in Psychology 2

Students are expected to take two courses in a substantive area of psychology, of which one may be a research methods course in a substantive area.

Milestone Courses include PSY 592: Master’s Research (6 credits); PSY 599: Master’s thesis (6 credits); PSY 792: Post-Master’s Research (12 credits); and PSY 799: Dissertation (12 credits) 

Quantitative Research Laboratories

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